Background Noise - Episode 8 features Enzo & Nio

Enzo and Nio Matt Bomarr has been busy creating a great musical podcast series called "Background Noise" which explores the music a number of street artists listen to for inspiration or while they are creating their work. Each podcast features an an hour or more of musical selections from the artists and is accompanied by interviews of the artists regarding their musical selections and experiences. In Episode 8, Matt explores explores the musical selections of Enzo and Nio. He also did a great job summarizing E&N's work and included a link to the Dega Film's "Wild in the Streets" segment about Enzo & Nio.

Visit Bomarr Blog's Background Noise, Episode 8: Enzo & Nio to see the original interview, images and listen to the podcast. By clicking here.

Or subscribe to "Background Noise" on iTunes, listen on Mixcloud or use the player below!

The Bomarr Blog Presents: The Background Noise Podcast Series, Episode 8: Enzo & Nio by Bomarr on Mixcloud

 


 

“Outdoor Gallery - New York City” Street Art Book Includes Enzo & Nio Work and Interviews (2)

Enzo & Nio are featured in Outdoor Gallery - New York CityOutdoor Gallery – New York City documents the vibrant and diverse outdoor art of New York, a global epicenter for street art and graffiti. The book features works created by 46 of the most prolific artists working on the streets of New York City. The beautifully photographed artworks are accompanied by illuminating interviews, which consist of the artists’ thoughts on New York, the current state of street art, the future of this dynamic medium, and their own work and processes. As outdoor art is ephemeral and constantly changing, it is necessarily current and relevant, Outdoor Gallery captures the zeitgeist of this dynamic countercultural art form in the context of the global movement.

Other artists profiled in Outdoor Gallery- New York City include:
Chris Stain, Toofly, Joe Iurato, Alice Mizarachi, Nick Walker, Dain, OCMC, Lillian Lorraine, Astrodub, Russell King, Elle Deadsex, Adam Dare, Fumero, Army of One, ASVP, Jilly Ballistic, Enzo and Nio, Miyok, Gilf!, Icy and Sot, Tripel, Hellbent, EKG, Optimo, Roycer, Shiro, Indie184, Cope2, Free5, Cern, Sofia Maldonado, Phetus88, Bishop203, Never Satisfied, ChrisRWK, VengRWK, Gaia, The Yok, Sheryo, Kram, elsol25, bunny M, QRST, ND'A, OverUnder, LunarNewYear, Billy Mode, DirtyBandits, Shinshin, Eras and Adam Cost.


 

Enzo & Nio Keep it Real

from Vandalog  Enzo & Nio Future-Now girl keeping a watchful eye in NYC

Although I’ve hardly written about Enzo and Nio on Vandalog before, I’ve been a big fan of their work for a while now. They work together to put up some great street art, mostly around NYC and other East Coast cities and in the form of wheatpastes and stickers. Their work is clever and fun, but also a bit controversial at times, which might explain why I haven’t known them to do any outdoor work with permission. There aren’t many street artists left in New York City with their talents who haven’t transitioned into doing primarily legal work, so I have to hand it to Enzo and Nio for keeping their work to street art’s roots of illegal free expression and surprise. Also, while so many street artists quickly fall into a pattern with one or two trademark styles that they unwaveringly stick to, Enzo and Nio put out a visually diverse range of street art. (Click to see original article and more)


 

Enzo & Nio support the petition to decriminalize street art in Barcelona

Stop Arresting Artists! by Xupet Negre in response to strict Barcelona laws against street art

In 2012 Enzo & Nio debuted their work in Europe in Barcelona, Spain. There they met a welcome and enthusiastic audience. Their work in Barcelona got them a lot of exposure including a magazine cover, an in-depth interview and a spot in the movie "Las Calles Hablan", a movie about the Barcelona street art scene.

Enzo & Nio's work in Barcelona exposed them to a lot of artists and other amazing people who are very serious and enthusiatistic about how street art positively effects the urban environment in the city. Unfortunately, beginning in 2006 the local government began conducting an increasingly restrictive campaign to eliminate this modern art movement from the city landscape. To date the government is actively persecuting, harassing and arresting artists and also removing incredible pieces of work from public spaces including masterpieces by Keith Haring and Os Gemeos! The government has also begun to dictate that street-art-friendly shop owners cannot have street art on their shop shutters!

In an effort to curb the local government's war on street art, the makers of the film "Las Calles Hablan" have created a petition to get the local government  to cease their no-tolerance program and to see street art for what it really is: a cultural asset for Barcelona and many cities in the world just like it.

Enzo & Nio fully support the Barcelona Street Art Petition and urge their Spanish friends to investigate it and sign it. Enzo & Nio also encourage their fans from the USA and other cities and countries to support it in spirit and with encouragement to our Spanish friends.

Barcelona's Soul Report Interview: Enzo & Nio

Cockshark by Enzo & Nio is one of the pieces of street art that have appeared around Barcelona, Spain

by Lula C. Sánchez for The Soul Report

¡Haga clic aquí para ver la versión en español!

Enzo & Nio have been one of the latest to drop their messages around Barcelona, despite in 2006 the Barcelona City Council passed a law which prohibited all types of urban art in the public spaces of the city. They have known each other for more than twenty years, but it was only a couple of years ago that they started working together, using the street as an artistic medium to display their creativity.

 

"…Barcelona is bustling yet laid back, passionate, welcoming, decadent yet thrift. Steeped in history but still looking forward…" -Nio Gallo

Bride Idol stands guard in Barcelona by Enzo & Nio (Photo by Lula Canelafina)

"…Barcelona is about energy and vibe, it is about art and music and food. It is about color and texture. It is about history, suffering and the rekindling of hope and joy…" -Enzo Sarto

 

The creative universe of Enzo & Nio is hard to define or label. In their work there is room for both social, economical and political criticism as well as humor “…we did not want to be limited nor defined by any singular image, topic or style…”. Their works seek to provoke reflection in the viewer, regardless of the reaction being positive or negative. What really matters is that the observers react.

To do so they use several tools from graphic design, photography to painting and different resources such as the sticker - Bomba and Cockshark- or the wheatpaste, the technique by which ultrathin paper posters are glued with a very resistant adhesive. Such is the case of Idols or their particular appropriation of Magritte’s work "…Doing a Mashup of a Magritte is just our way of paying homage with an E&N spin…"

Their first series, Future Now, displays masked and armed little girls to make us reflect on the catastrophe looming over our future if we steal their innocence today. From the series Future Now arises Idol, their next series, which explores and denounces women marginalization and undervaluation. They seized Catholic iconography such as niches and they replaced religious figures by little girls, teenagers and housewives who appear armed with guns and bombs. With their character Bomba, which was part of a very large sticker, they try to convey philosophical messages sometimes and make us smile at others. Similarly, with Cockshark they impact deeply on the absurdity of the consumer society and try to provoke reflection on how invasive advertising is on the city streets.

If taste is the ability we have to judge an object, work of art in this particular case, as something beautiful in a disinterested way, just for the sake of the pleasant satisfaction it produces, then the creative universe of Enzo & Nio, on top of captivating me, it strongly stimulates me and heightens me because with one image they tell us a history.

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